Think Like an Athlete and Improve your Mental Health. Part 2 – Asking for Help

Think Like an Athlete and Improve your Mental Health. Part 2 – Asking for Help

Larry King recently stated on Tim Ferris’ Podcast that by the time an athlete’s career is over (approximately at age 30) they will have gone through as many failures and successes as you will have in your entire career. I have experienced this through my career as a professional extreme skier. So how do athletes mentally handle the intense emotional roller-coaster? Athletes not only have tremendous physical strength, they also have resilience and mental strength. One factor that makes them so mentally strong is how they ask for help.

Asking for Help

Asking for help is second nature for an athlete. They recognise that without the guidance and direction from a professional they will never improve. Athletes also recognise that they cannot be expected to know everything; they are surrounded by a team of experts. For instance: a physiotherapist knows the ins and outs of the mechanical movement of the human body; a nutritionalist knows to the gram exactly what an athlete needs to eat to be at their full optimization and so on. An athlete knows it is their job to be in the best shape, mentally and physically, and to turn to others to ask for help when something isn’t quite right.

Asking for help on my line choice down Granite Peak

When I am out skiing with friends I am constantly watching how they ski, their line choices, their daily practices and routines so that I can learn from them. If there was something I struggled with on a ski run, like coming off a pillow line too quickly into trees, I would immediately turn to a friend and ask how they did it better than me. During my recent training for the Freeride World Tour stop in Chile I began to feel a niggle in my left knee. Within the week I was booked in with my physio and asking for help. When I initially moved back to the UK after 10 years of living Canada, I knew I would need help with the adjustment of lifestyle so I booked an appointment with my therapist, Vanessa. I am so used to turning to a professional and asking for help.

A client of mine, who was also a professional freestyle skier, was one of the best in the world. About half way through a winter he began to finish mid level at competitions rather than his usual podium finishes. He immediately thought “I need help”. In this particular case the issues were coming from his head and having self-doubt. He sought help with me and with a sports psychologist. By the end of the winter he was back to his podium finishes. He immediately took upon himself to resolve this as quickly as possible. Would you react the same in a work situation? How long would it take you to reach out and ask for help? How much would your work need to suffer before you asked your boss for help?

For some reason asking for help is one of the hardest things for us to do. Whether it is something small like asking a co-worker to take some of your workload or something bigger, for instance when suffering with depression and asking your boss for time off or support. Everyone needs help sometimes and recongising that there are professionals out there who are trained to do exactly that, it begs the question – why would you not ask for help? I personally love being asked for help. It makes me feel needed and wanted. Not to mention the warm biological reaction of having dopamine released when I get to access the giving part of the brain. So ask a friend, co-worker or professional for help next time you need it.

For further reading this is an excellent article written by the Guardian on a teacher who was suffering with depression and asked her boss for help – Guardian Article

 

Why being in nature gives you excellent mental health

Why being in nature gives you excellent mental health

I have spent most of my life outdoors.  Having a childhood in California we spent our weekends biking, skiing, hiking and adventuring around national parks like Lake Tahoe & Yosemite.  Then in my adult life I lived in the beautiful mountains of Whistler, Canada.  Skiing 150+ days a year and the rest of the days I spent biking, hiking, camping and swimming in lakes.  I was always outdoors.  Even if I was just relaxing at home I would sit out on the balcony over looking the woods or soak up the sun on my front door step.  But I never linked being relaxed with how much time I was spending outdoors.  Until recently.

I recently moved back to London and it is quite the change from the Canadian mountain lifestyle I have been living for the past ten years.  I absolutely love London.  I can not get board.  It is full of excitement and a never ending list of things to do and see.  However, I haven’t been able to shake off my old habits of constantly being outside.  Majority of my weekends are spent out in the countryside exploring new areas and aimlessly hiking in the hills and forests.  When I want to meet up with my brother or friends I will always suggest a walk a long the Thames instead of or as well as meeting for a pint.  I’ve also taken up rowing since moving back to the UK.

A huge draw to taking up rowing was not only is it an extremely athletic workout but that it is an outdoor sport.  I love the quiet mornings and calm evenings on the river.  In the spring the ducklings are out, in the summer the sun is warm on your back, in the autumn the leaves decorate the river with colour and in the winter the frost creates a white wonderland.  It is beautiful.  I find when I come off the water I am buzzing with energy or extremely relaxed.

My partner lives in the New Forest.  This is a great place to explore.  Giant Sequoia trees, forest covered in purple heather, wild ponies and the sea and beaches.  It is a breathe of fresh air to be down there.  The forest is so quiet that you can only hear the leaves rustling.  I spend hours walking which helps me problem solve, relax and get the endorphins I need.  We don’t just hike around we measure how wide the trees are (using our own arm span of course), try to build forts with tree branches, rope swing across streams and slide in mud.  I apparently haven’t grown up.  But at the end of the day I feel so incredibly relaxed (also completely knackered).

When I’m not in the UK I’m in the mountains.  It’s where I feel the most at home.  Even though the mountains can be temperamental, it is where I am most calm.  Completely away from noise, crowds and pollution.  The beauty of the vast peaks, white snowcapped mountains, birds, such as condors, circulating in the air, creature footprints in the snow the sounds of the wind blowing or streams running.

Only since moving to London have I been able to connect the dots that nature is what keeps me calm and in excellent mental health.  The feeling I have after a session out on the water, or a days hike in the forest or a weeks trip in the Alps is like no other.  I have such a feeling of accomplishment, I sleep much better, I am relaxed and full of endorphins. Studies show the benefits of being outdoors are

  • Less anxiety & improved happiness
  • Reduce stress levels.
  • Improve your sleep.
  • Improved eye sight.  Rather than straining your eyes looking at screens you’re exercising the muscles in your eyes to look in to the distance.
  • Getting your daily Vitamin D amount and boosting your immune system.

Eco therapy is a type of therapy that helps to heal mental health issues by being in nature.  It is proven to be extremely successful and is increasingly becoming more popular.  It is so easy to get fixated on the small daily annoyances or even the big things life throws at us.  But it all seems to melt away when you get out in nature.  So get outside and spend at least an hour embracing what it around you.   I promise you that pint and roast dinner will taste all the better after a walk in the woods.

Rachel

Photo Credit: Rick Findler www.rickfindler.co.uk

Think Like an Athlete and Improve your Mental Health. Part 1 – Accepting Criticism

Think Like an Athlete and Improve your Mental Health. Part 1 – Accepting Criticism

Larry King recently stated on Tim Ferris’ Podcast that by the time an athlete’s career is over (approximately at age 30) they will have gone through as many failures and successes as you will have in your entire career. I have experienced this through my career as a professional extreme skier. So how do athletes mentally handle the intense emotional roller-coaster? Athletes not only have tremendous physical strength, they also have resilience and mental strength. One factor that makes them so mentally strong is how they handle criticism.

Taking Criticism

Athletes receive criticism day in and day out.  I don’t mean from the haters on Twitter, but rather from those who are closest to them, such as their coach. This could easily get anyone down, but it doesn’t seem to faze athletes.  A coach is there to analyse athlete performance and identify areas that can be improved upon. Yes, with every run I skied came a high five and “well done” but they also came with an endless list of things to work on such as: “your take off was too slow”, “you dropped your shoulder on your landing”, and “why the hell did you choose to ski that line?” Every chair ride back up the mountain was spent being told what I did wrong and how to improve.

Analysing our line choice after skiing Santa Terra, Chile.

After each Freeride competition there is an opportunity to ask the judges for feedback.  They will honestly and openly tell you where you went wrong.  They don’t do this to be malicious they do it because they want you to improve.  They want the sport to improve.  I remember one particular competition there was a new girl on the tour who didn’t place very well in the competition.  She was getting some tough truths from the judges after the award ceremony.  She was in tears.  But sure enough there she was at the next competition skiing harder and better than before.  It was obvious the criticism and disappointment had upset her in the moment but she was back displaying she had worked on what needed improving.  In every sport, every competition or match is analysed and criticised.

Judges at the Freeride World Tour watch and take notes on the athletes line choice and skiing technique

Think of a Premier football match.  The boys don’t get to go home and relax, they have a debriefing in the locker room on what went wrong and the next day they are back at training analysing the footage from the day before.

Athletes can filter the productive criticism from the useless criticism.  They know who to take advice from.  A coach, at trainer, a physiotherapist, a sports psychologist are all qualified and highly regarded.  It is easy to listen to the voice of a professional.   An athlete will take no notice of someone criticising them who does not know what they are talking about.  And you should do the same!  Lets face it there are some bullies out there who just like to put us down, but why take any notice of them!?  Listen to those people in your profession you look up to; a manager, co-worker or even a competitor.

When we are working on a project in our professional roles and we are provided with feedback and constructive criticism, it is natural to feel defeated and downhearted sometimes – but this does not have to be the case at all! Your boss, co-workers, and team are all trying to help you improve so that you can grow, learn and continue to succeed in your career. I am grateful to every coach, teammate, manager, trainer, and friend who has told me where I’m going wrong and as a result I am constantly striving for improvement. Don’t let the criticisms get you down, embrace it.  As an athlete, I am so grateful for constructive criticism; without it I would feel frustrated and wonder why I was still not winning medals. I now look forward to receiving feedback as I know that by the end of the day I will be a better skier because of it.  I have to admit being criticised my brother, Rick, telling me to “stop being such a pussy” is the best form of criticism to make me ski harder! 😉

 

Rachel.

Steps to Accepting Criticism:

  1. Listen closely to what is being said.
  2. Don’t react in the moment.  It is easy to get defensive.  Especially when we have worked hard on something.  Acknowledge the emotion but don’t engage with it.
  3. Go away and think about what has been said.  Are these criticisms true. We don’t always want to believe that we made a mistake but sometimes we need to put our hand up and say “Yes, you are correct”.
  4. Chose one thing you would like to improve on.  I could be told 5 areas that I need to work on by a coach.  It is impossible to correct 5 things at once, we can only work on so much.  I would chose one thing I wanted to focus on for the next few ski runs.
  5. Communicate the area you are going to work on to your team.  They need validation that you heard what had been said to you and that you are going to focus on improving a particular area.  If there are other areas that need attention, communicate you will focus on them once this area has been perfected.  Communication is key otherwise managers will think feedback has fallen on deaf ears.
  6. Make a plan on how to improve this task/skill.  This could be asking for advice, reading material on your subject or simply being more aware moving forward.
  7. As you begin to improve your skill level it will become second nature to you and before you know it this area is perfected 🙂
5 Ways to De-stress at Work

5 Ways to De-stress at Work

83% of us state that work is our primary source of stress (APA Excellency Stress & Management Report 2017)  So what can we do to stay calm at work?  Before you panic from stress overload here are 5 ways to de-stress.

1.Go for a 30 minute walk

Not only will this remove you from your stressful environment but walking is also a great problem solver.  According to researchers at Stanford University, as we walk the creative and problem solving part of the brain lights up.  You might discover a new solution to a problem that is causing you stress at work.  And of course you’ll be getting exercise which reduces cortisol in the body.  Not to mention the fresh air and Vitamin D you’ll be getting.

2. Take a Lunch Break

Oh, did you know this already? Then why aren’t you doing it?  According to research by BUPA only 30% of us are taking our lunch breaks.  People have fought hard for your right to a lunch break!  Working through your lunch will only increase your stress levels and you are actually less productive if you work through your lunch.  Resulting in that work load only piling up instead of decreasing.

If you remove yourself from your desk for lunch you are probably going to make a healthier choice in what you have for lunch.  Through my own observations from the offices I have worked with those eating at their desks are eating crisps, chocolate, sandwiches and drinking sodas. All the bad foods that feed stress and depression.  Compared to those who go out for lunch and take the time to decide what they are going to eat and as a result make a healthier decision.

3. Do Something Nice for a Co-worker

Giving is an action that creates the ‘feel good’ hormones in our bodies. The act of giving is scientifically shown to reduce levels of depression.  When we do something nice for someone it lights up the reward centre of our brain.  So one of the quickest ways to feel better is to do something nice for someone.  Make your co-worker a cup of tea, buy them some flowers or take them out for lunch.  Then the cycle begins, they will do the same for you down the road when you need someone to take your for lunch.

4. Read

Reading can reduce your stress levels by 68%!!! That is a huge amount.  Imagine, right now you can be feeling 68% less stressed than ten minutes ago.  As you are at work it may not be appropriate to read Fifty Shades of Grey, but you can read a book or journal related to your field.  My office is filled with books by entrepreneurs, health specialists and companies Annual Reports.  When it all gets a bit too much I enjoy reading an entrepreneurs story on how they overcame all odds and achieved their success.  Even it is only for 10 minutes.

 

5. Meditate

I recently had a meeting at Lululemon’s London Office.  We met in their very comfortable meditation room filled with soft cushions, couches and candles.  I know we can’t all be that lucky, but you don’t need a meditation room to meditate.  In fact you don’t need much, just yourself.  Meditation has proven to quieten the area of the brain that causes us to worry and stress.  Meditation allows us to take a quick break from the stress.  The best part is that even after our meditation our brain remains calm.

A simple way to start is sitting at your desk with your eyes relaxed and gazing down at your desk.  It doesn’t matter if there are documents on your desk (you can pretend to be reading something while you do this). You are going to take some nice slow deep breathes.  Counting each exhale up to ten breathes.  When you have reached ten, start back to 1 again.  With each exhale allow your shoulders to relax.  Then your back.  Then your jaw, hands, legs and so on. Repeat doing this till you are ready to get back to work.  Don’t worry if your mind wonders, just come back to counting your breathes.  And if you’re really lost start at 1 again.  The idea is to retrain the brain to not run with endless thoughts.  By counting you’re giving your brain something to focus on.  A single act.  The breathes themselves are helping your body relax.  It is an all round relaxation technique.  No one in the office will ever know what you are doing.  Enjoy!

Skiing The Chimney Couloir at 4,000 meters Chile

Skiing The Chimney Couloir at 4,000 meters Chile

As soon as you arrive into the Three Valleys of the Andes one of the first things you notice is a giant couloir, The Chimney, staring right at you. It is hard to ignore and it is hard to fight the desire to go ski it.  The Chimney stands at 4,000 meters and a good hike from the ski resort, La Parva.

I’d only been in Chile for a day and already I had my sights set on The Chimney.  Day two of my trip I woke up early to find all my local friends too hung over to go skiing.  (The benefits of living in the mountains rather than having a limited number of days to go skiing).  My friend, Cami, offered to drive me to La Parva, only a five minute drive down the road where I hoped to meet a friend and go hike the Chimney.

After skiing solo all morning I realised the whole town was too hung over to ski and reality that I may be hiking the Chimney alone started kicking in.  I decided to do the first section of the hike, which would take me up to the main ridge, to scope things out.  It’s a small pitch and it looked like there were a few fresh turns to be had if I skied straight back down.  The turns were so good that I did this short hike twice.  I decided to reward myself with a hot chocolate and mean while find some locals or ski patrollers to ask about the avalanche danger of The Chimney.

I was told the avalanche danger was low and The Chimney was “good right now”.  That was all I needed to hear.  Skis thrown on my backpack I began my hike.  My eagerness and excitement had over shadowed the reality of being out hiking on my own.

For those of you who haven’t been hiking at 4,000+ meters let me explain to you how it feels.  With every breathe you feel as though your lungs are going to collapse inside your ribs. Your throat is bleeding and burning with every inhale.  Every movement you make is a struggle.  Your steps are half what you would normally take.  When you feel as though you’ve achieved a good distance you turn around to discover you’ve only moved 100m.  Not to mention your head races with panic that you can’t breathe.  But knowing all this I wasn’t phased. I was prepared to take my time and move at whatever speed I felt comfortable.  This was not a race.

As soon as I reached the first ridge the wind had really picked up compared to the morning.  I took a quick video and as soon as I turned the camera off a gust of wind came blowing me off my feet and falling on my side. (You can hear how strong the wind is in the video).

I did a quick scan and could see only one large boulder that I could crawl to for shelter.  At one of my events someone asked me “what is the most scared you have ever been?” They were surprised by my answer as it wasn’t a line I had skied or a cliff I jumped off.  It was in 2015 on a ski touring visit to Nevados to Chillan, Chile and the winds were so strong we could not even stand back up.  I had to lay down and watch a friend hiking on the other side of the valley nearly be blown off a knife ridge.  So you can imagine how my nerves kicked in when I was blown off my feet – again!  “Nothing lasts forever” I told myself as I hugged the boulder.  I knew the wind had to die down at some stage so i might as well take a selfie.  The only thing you can do in these situations is wait for the moment to pass. You can’t control the wind and it is wasted energy to panic.  So I entertained myself by seeing how loudly I could sing before I could hear myself over the wind.  It turns out I had to really scream to hear my own voice.

Eventually the wind calmed down to just an aggressive breeze rather than a gale.  I wasn’t sure if I should continue as the ridge I would be walking along has drops of 200ft of it, with a lot of exposed rocks.  But I knew I could turn back at any time so I should just push on.  The walk felt endless.  There was no snow at the top of the ridge this winter so I was walking on rocks in ski boots.  For those of you who don’t ski, ski boots are horrendously awkward to walk in at the best of times never mind trying to negotiate rocks and boulders in them.  The terrain began to turn into a steep rocky slope.  With every step my foot slid down and the rocks underneath me no longer supported me.

After what felt like hours of walking, clambering rocks and being soaked from sweat I began to wonder if I had gone to far.  I was trying to avoid walking on the edge of the mountain so I wouldn’t be blown off but I paid the price for this.  I had missed the entrance to The Chimney.  Damn it! I thought.  What do I do now? Hike back along the ridge in the wind or just give up and walk back the way I came.  I looked at the time. “Oh shit” then looked at the low sun.  I hadn’t registered how late it was.  If I hike back I run the risk of hiking in the dark.  If I hike along the ridge I run the risk of being blown off but if I find the couloir quickly I can be down in about half an hour.

I hadn’t hiked all this way to back out now so I began clambering up the rocks to the cliff edge.  After walking for only 10 minutes there she was! The Chimney!!!  I looked down at the steep narrow couloir and my adrenaline really kicked in.  I could not get my skis on fast enough.  A mix of nerves and excitement flooded my body.  Gopro on – check. Backpack secure – check.  Poles – check. Boots done up – nope. “Damn it Rachel focus” I thought.  I took a few deep breathes with my skis hanging over the edge.  Dropping!!!

The exhilaration you feel as you ski down this couloir is like no other.  Surrounded by sheer granite with snow moving under neath your feet with every turn it makes you forget the hard work you put in to get there.  Soaked in sweat I couldn’t stop grinning the whole way back to town.   Like with every goal we achieve in life we only remember the feeling of achieving it not the hardship it took to get there.  Remember that next time you’re standing at the bottom looking up at your next goal.  It’s all worth it.

Rachel.

A Rewarding Sunset after a fantastic day skiing